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Hmm.. this explains a lot

Posted by akee123 
Hmm.. this explains a lot
December 30, 2019 02:26PM
YOU AND STEELY DID AN INTERVIEW WITH RED BULL WHERE YOU SAID SOMETHING VERY INTERESTING ABOUT HOW YOU STARTED TO MAKE SOME OF THE RHYTHMS FOR YOUR OWN LABEL LESS MELODIC BECAUSE SOME OF THE DEEJAYS COULDN'T STAY IN KEY.

Right. We felt that, Steely being out of the ghetto, we had a soft heart for struggling youths. Some of them have very good lyrics, had something to say that could help Jamaica and help the world at large to understand what they were feeling. So as a means of expression we said “Alright you know what? If they're not able to hold a key, let's make the music more minimalistic and more drum-driven”. We did that with When with Tiger for instance and we stripped it down and it was more drum-driven. The Giggy rhythm, the drums were playing the main bass, so we stripped it down and used less chords where you can actually relatively identify that the artist is off key. We did it deliberately to accommodate artists who might not be able to deliver melodically. But they had something to say.
Re: Hmm.. this explains a lot
December 30, 2019 07:14PM
i'm guessing this is a reference to the period of the early 90s.. maybe say 91 onward ?

if so, it makes sense in that this was around the time when the riddims migrated from those full, thick basslines used by music works(gussie) to a more stripped down sound along the lines of say shabba's 'ting a ling a ling' and buju's "bogle"

this was also around the time steve barrow coined the term 'carpenter riddim'.. meaning the riddim is basically a bare bones riddim, sounding like a carpenter hammering away on various things.
i remember the sound changing when i would receive my pack of outernational sample tapes...
then confirmed others heard the same when reading barrows article in the beat, i believe summer of 91.
yep.. just a teenager whose only hobby besides working out and playing high school basketball was to read every article
in my highly anticipated bi-monthly Beat magazine.
Re: Hmm.. this explains a lot
December 31, 2019 03:34AM
hmm.....very interesting....Tiger is a big standout as an artist though, I just dropped a huge box of old cds, when I saw Tiger I decided to keep all his cds
Re: Hmm.. this explains a lot
December 31, 2019 04:26PM
You’re right on.... and I would also welcome The Beat just to read Rogers Ramblings.
It never occurred to me that the musicians would be changing the tunes to accommodate the DJs having basically no pitch or melodic sense

Quote
bigvein
i'm guessing this is a reference to the period of the early 90s.. maybe say 91 onward ?

if so, it makes sense in that this was around the time when the riddims migrated from those full, thick basslines used by music works(gussie) to a more stripped down sound along the lines of say shabba's 'ting a ling a ling' and buju's "bogle"

this was also around the time steve barrow coined the term 'carpenter riddim'.. meaning the riddim is basically a bare bones riddim, sounding like a carpenter hammering away on various things.
i remember the sound changing when i would receive my pack of outernational sample tapes...
then confirmed others heard the same when reading barrows article in the beat, i believe summer of 91.
yep.. just a teenager whose only hobby besides working out and playing high school basketball was to read every article
in my highly anticipated bi-monthly Beat magazine.
Re: Hmm.. this explains a lot
December 31, 2019 06:36PM
Quote
akee123

It never occurred to me that the musicians would be changing the tunes to accommodate the DJs having basically no pitch or melodic sense

Yea but this in no way justifies the present ant-cultural conundrum of a preponderance of DunceHELL DJ barking like rabid dog, glorifying violence, and grabbing dem private parts pon stage, instead of using our Creator given gifts to sing or singJ like Human Beings. If any1 want to share vocal spirit with other creatures make it the birds or the lions, but that gangsta rapid dog barking is infradig. And, it further don't justify bringing in that damn-blasted autotune mosquito freq. on steroids which is an attack on our healthy brain frequencies.




DUB


Re: Hmm.. this explains a lot
December 31, 2019 09:39PM


--------------------------------------
FullWatts on your stereo...™
Re: Hmm.. this explains a lot
January 02, 2020 06:49PM
Quote
Confucius Say

The best way to become enlightened
is to argue with people on social media
Re: Hmm.. this explains a lot
January 13, 2020 03:03AM
akee123, thanks for posting one of the more fascinating/surprising portions of Angus Taylor's two part interview with Cleveland 'Clevie' Brown. Well, this revelation may explain why I didnt buy too many records from this time period of Reggae/Dancehall.

Big Vein: "this was also around the time steve barrow coined the term 'carpenter riddim'.. meaning the riddim is basically a bare bones riddim, sounding like a carpenter hammering away on various things."

BV, Im so glad you recalled this and posted it !! Steve Barrow should get a trophy for that Carpenter observation/description.

While I admire Steely for having "a soft heart for struggling youths", struggling to get through a singer or DJ's sour delivery probably isnt the best idea if you want to entice & keep listeners' attention or buying more records.

Aside from that, it's the opposite approach of old time producers that ended up producing great records because they not only expected greatness, they demanded it --- or leave the studio.

Anyways, Angus does a very good job with his interviews... he asks interesting and well informed questions and lots of cool Clevie stories/info . Here are the links to the Clevie interviews:

Part 1
[www.reggaeville.com]

Part 2
[www.reggaeville.com]
Re: Hmm.. this explains a lot
January 13, 2020 02:05PM
"Aside from that, it's the opposite approach of old time producers that ended up producing great records because they not only expected greatness, they demanded it --- or leave the studio. "

yes, over the weekend i couldnt stop playing 60-80s roots music.. one thought came to me how those guys took a limited basic set of instruments and made these songs that sounded bigger than they actually were..
not bigger in only terms of sound, but also energy, feel, soul, delivery...




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